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Field Trips

 

The Club has monthly field trips from September through May.


UPCOMING FIELD TRIP - MARCH 11, 2017 - Grandview Nature Preserve Hampton - by Andy Hawkins

March is a transitional month and birding can be difficult. Water fowl are leaving, and warblers and other summer breeders have not arrived yet. Therefore, Jason Strickland and I will lead a walk at Grandview Nature Preserve in Hampton concentrating on shorebirds on March 11th. Some water fowl should be present and the habitats of Bay, Beach, Shoreline and Scrub Brush should produce a good species list of shorebirds and others.

We will meet at the gate of Grandview on State Park Dr. in Hampton at 7:00 am on the 11th. This trip will require some walking but you have a choice. Jason will walk to Factory Point and back. I will walk about half way and then return to the parking lot. My cell is 757-870-9641 and if you have questions call.


UPCOMING FIELD TRIP - APRIL 15, 2017 - Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge: Washington Ditch/Jericho Ditch - by Andy Hawkins

The Great Dismal Swamp will be the destination for our April 15 trip. Warblers and a good variety of other breeders and migrants should be present. We will meet at the Washington Ditch parking lot at 7:00am and spend a few hours on the Ditch. When we get back to the parking lot, if anyone wants to try the Jericho Ditch we can.

There will be walking involved but if one wants to sit near the parking lot, much can be seen and heard. My cell is 757-870-9641 and call if you have questions.


FIELD TRIP REPORT - FEBRUARY 13, 2017 - CBBT Islands - by Andy Hawkins

On February 13, 2017, twenty two of us met at the CBBT parking lot at 7:30 to take a tour of the three northern CBBT Islands. 60 degree days and light winds not being the norm for February we headed out, not sure what we would find, at 8 am and were not disappointed. Possibly the numbers were not as great as years passed but the quality was there. Highlights were a glaucous gull on the second, razorbills on the second and fourth, king and common eiders on the fourth, long-tailed ducks on the second, third and fourth and loons, red breasted mergansers, purple sandpipers, great cormorants and scoters everywhere. All in all a very nice, shirt sleeve morning in February. At eleven we split in two groups and some headed toward Back Bay in search of alcids and some headed to Willis Wharf in search of godwits. I went to Willis, and godwits and willets we found.

Field Trip Participants - photo by Andy Hawkins

Razorbill - Photo by Andy Hawkins

Glaucous Gull - Photo by Andy Hawkins

Long-tailed Duck - Photo by Andy Hawkins


FIELD TRIP REPORT - JANUARY 14, 2017 - CBBT Islands - by Andy Hawkins

January 14th, Jason Strickland and I led a birding trip to Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and False Cape State Park. The federal Wildlife Refuge closes the East and West Dike areas during the winter months so the water fowl can rest and there is no thoroughfare to False Cape State Park except to hike in on the beach or reserve the Tram. We left the Back Bay Visitors Center at 9am but while we were boarding the tram two American bitterns flew over. The morning was cloudy but not bitter cold and the rain held off. Highlights were the bitterns, nineteen American white pelicans, white ibis, one Lincoln Sparrow, three immature white-crowned sparrows and many ducks and swans.

The complete list follows:
Tundra swans, gadwalls, wigeons, buffleheads, Canada geese, black ducks, mallards, northern shoveler, pintail, ring-necked ducks, hooded mergansers, ruddy ducks, wood duck, surf scoters, white-winged scoter, black scoter, red-throated loon, common loon, pie-billed grebe, cormorant, brown pelican, America bitterns, great blue herons, great egrets, american coots, ring-billed gulls, herring gulls, northern gannets, American White Pelicans, white Ibis, king rail, sanderling, great back-backed gull, red-bellied woodpecker, downy woodpecker, northern flicker, house wren, brown thrasher, white crown sparrows, Lincoln sparrow, swamp sparrows, northern harriers, bald eagles, mourning doves, belted kingfisher, blue jay, American crow, Carolina wren, robins, catbird, mockingbird, yellow-rumped warbler, white-throated sparrow, towhee, cardinal, red-winged blackbird, meadowlark, Carolina chickadees, golden-crowned kinglet, ruby- crowned kinglet.

Photos below by Andy Hawkins

Jane Frigo

Tram Ride to Back Bay

White Ibis


FIELD TRIP REPORT - OCTOBER 16, 2016 - Eastern Shore - by Andy Hawkins

Saturday, October 15, dawned as a beautiful early fall morning, mostly sunny with a light north east wind. We met at the south toll gate and proceeded to the 1st Island. Not a lot there so we hurried to The Eastern Shore National Wildlife Refuge, Ramp Road, hoping to catch the morning warblers. We were not disappointed except there were so many small birds it was difficult to identify them. Jason got word of a rare sighting so off we went just north of Kiptopeke to find a sandhill crane feeding in a cut corn field, truly one of the highlights of the day.

Next we headed to The Magothy Bay Natural Area Preserve, then Kiptopeke State Park for lunch and a stop at the Hawk Watch Station. We ran into the Williamsburg Bird Club there and Bill Williams told us of a gallinule at the landfill. We found the common gallinule and more, then headed to Oyster and finished the day at Savage Neck Dunes. All told we counted eighty-eight species and had a very full day of birding. Attending were Jason Strickland, Mark Nichols, Stuart Sweetman, Pete and Charm Peterman, Bill Boeh, Phyllis Roth, Felicity Rask and John Ericson, James Abbott and Andy Hawkins.

Complete species list for the day:

Canada Goose
American Black Duck
Ruddy Duck
Double-crested Cormorant
Brown Pelican
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
White Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper’s Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Clapper Rail
Common Gallinule
American Coot
Sandhill Crane
Killdeer
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Wilson’s Snipe

Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willett
Lesser Yellowlegs
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Blue-headed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
House Wren

Marsh Wren
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Swainson’s Thrush
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Common Yellowthroat
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Nelson’s Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Dark-eyed Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Saturday, SEPTEMBER 10, 2016 - Hog Island - by Andy Hawkins

Taking a five-mile hike with temperatures in the upper eighties and with high humidity is a tough way to see birds but that is what most of the group did at Hog Island September the tenth. We spent the morning mostly on the main road but the interior held the promise of shore birds so off the group went. Bobolinks, turkeys and blue grosbeaks in the corn field, bobwhites calling, which is a sound sadly rarely heard in Virginia much anymore, many egrets and herons, nine species of warblers, sandpipers, dowitchers and eagles made the trip more than worthwhile. Sixty-seven species were seen in all and a morning well spent with dedicated birders and good friends.

Left to right; Harry Colestock, Jacques van Montfrans, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jason Strickland, Rochelle Colestock, Dave Youker, Matt Echaniz, Gwen Harris, Stuart Sweetman, Jane Frigo, Tom Charlock, Bill McCullough, Brian Barmore, Ernie Miller, (Photographer Andy Hawkins)


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Saturday, MAY 14, 2016 - Richmond's Belle Isle and James River Parks - by Stuart Sweetman

The May field trip for the HRBC was to Richmond, VA to hike the trails of the James River Park System to include the Reedy Creek/ Buttermilk Trail and Belle Isle. Our group met at the parking area off of Riverside Dr in Richmond around 7:00 AM for a full day of hiking the trails of this unique area. The park system is adjacent to downtown Richmond and runs along the upper end of the James River. The trails are elevated high over the river which gives a near treetop perspective which is ideal for hearing and locating those spring migrants that his made this trip one of our favorites over the past few years. The trails are not just steep and windy they are narrow and covered with poison ivy on both sides. With all of that being said the Richmond Park System is a sought after location for birders and hikers, it is also loved by mountain bikers and lovers of beautiful scenery from lush woodlands to rock covered shores and river rapids.

This area during the spring seems to be a hot spot for migrants and we were not disappointed. We managed fifteen Warbler species as well as Thrush, Flycatchers and Orioles. Its a long walk from Reedy Creek to Belle Isle but its worth it for not just the scenery but for the not so common species that nest out over the river. The suspension foot bridge that hangs under the Robert E. Lee (US 301) bridge give the only vantage point to one of just a few Cliff Swallow colonies found in Virginia. The colony was much smaller this year unfortunately but this might be because of a pair of Peregrine Falcons that we believe were nesting on the outside edge of the bridge. Due to the length of this mostly walking trip not everyone who begins the trip makes till the end, but everyone has enjoyed the day trip and well rewarded for the efforts. Our group of 18 managed an impressive 75 species. A complete list of participants and species are listed below.

Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Dianne Snyder, Bill Boeh, Tom Charlock, Pete and Charm Peterman, Anthony Nixon, John, Kim, Thomas and Travis Hogan, Nick and Elisa Flanders, Jane Frigo, Kathy Bond, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jacques Van Montfrans, and Lieve Keeney.

Complete species list for the day:

Canada Goose
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Peregrine Falcon
Spotted Sandpiper
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird


White-eyed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Veery
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
Canada Warbler
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Saturday, APRIL 16, 2016 - Great Dismal Swamp - by Stuart Sweetman

The April field trip for the HRBC was to The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Suffolk, VA. Our group of 23 met at the Jericho Ditch parking area at 7:00 am to a beautiful spring morning of cool air and bright skies. We assembled here for our morning walks along the wooded trails that border the drainage and irrigation ditches that cris-cross the whole refuge allowing a unique habitat for numerous migrating and breeding bird species. Springtime in the swamp is a perfect time to see and hear many different Warbler species that visit the swamp and call it their home. Twelve Warbler species were identified with the resident Prairie Warbler being the most common giving great looks and singing throughout the morning. White-eyed Vireos, Catbirds and Common Yellowthroats were also well represented.

The group later headed down the road to Washington Ditch to bird the boardwalk and the ditch walking trail. We arrived at the parking area where we ran into Bob Ake and his group from the Williamsburg bird club that had just finished up their morning walk of the ditch area. We were excited to see old friends and we exchanged notes letting them know what we saw and they let us know what to look out for. The boardwalk gave a few of us a good look of the always heard but almost never seen Ovenbird and everyone's favorite Hooded Warbler came in close for all to see this beautiful bird of spring. Our trip finished up in the early afternoon with 58 bird species identified on a great day for all in the swamp.



Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Doug Rogers, Joanne Brickner, John and Marilyn Adair, Ellis and Wendy Maxey, Bill Boeh, Tom Charlock, John, Kim, Thomas and Travis Hogan, Anthony Nixon, Sandy Dicarlo, Jane Frigo, Peggy Rommen, Bill Lundberg, Andy Hawkins, Ernie Miller, Jessica Ausura, Justin Ausura and Karen Brandt visiting from Arlington.

Complete species list for the day:

Wood Duck
Wild Turkey
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker

Great Crested Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Purple Martin
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Palm Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Ovenbird
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Saturday, MARCH 12, 2016 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and False Cape State Park - by Stuart Sweetman

The March field trip for the HRBC was to Back Bay NWR and False Cape SP. The group met at 7:30 am at the visitors center of the refuge to sunny skies with temps. in the low 50's, but a strong breeze off the water gave a nice bite to the air. The winter months had been unusually warm so frozen lakes and marshland were not an issue as in the past. The impoundments of the refuge are closed to the public during the winter months except for scheduled open air tram tours. Tram tours for special groups are scheduled two months in advance running from 8:00 am - 12:00 pm. There is a 8 dollar per person fee and a 24 person limit. Our guide met us at 7:30 for a head count and to collect money.

We boarded the tram and got underway for our trip through the impoundments of the refuge ending up at False Cape SP. The first gate to enter the refuge was by the maintenance area. This area was where the reported Lark Sparrow was hanging out with Field Sparrows. Our whole group was treated to this rarity that stuck out on a tree branch posing for us like he knew that we were there just to see him.

The tram continued on stopping every hundred yards or so for us to observe the waterfowl that populated open waters. American Coots were numerous as well as Gadwall and Blue-winged Teal. A large group of Tundra Swans were still present and three Mute Swans were mixed in showing contrast of the two species.

Photo by John Adair

We made our way down past the refuge to False Cape State Park where the habitat changed to from wetland to pine forest. March is still early for migrants, but the Pine Warblers were getting a jump on spring vocalization.

Down at False Cape SP there is a real nice visitors center with refreshments and clean bathrooms. The air was still cold but don't tell that to the four Cottonmouths that were just off the road near the canal that bordered the area. Our guide told us that they are always there even when the temps. are down in the forties. So much for being cold blooded.

Photo by John Adair

We left False cape and headed back to the refuge for the return trip. We were treated by a couple hundred White Ibis along the way to go along with the single Glossy Ibis that was seen earlier. Pied-billed Grebes and Northern Shovelers were seen along the way. We made it back to the visitors center where we disembarked and thanked our guide for a great trip.

Photo by John Adair

Most of the group headed home, but a few of us walked to the beach to see what we could see out over the ocean. Red-throated and Common Loons were seen as well as Horned Grebes and Gannets. Lastly a couple of us walked the boardwalk behind the visitor center where we picked up a couple of Swamp Sparrows, and a American Oystercatcher did a flyby. Two Eastern Phoebe's were working the grass area behind the center. One other point of interest is that on the main road heading in to the refuge (Sandpiper Road) there are Eurasian Collared-Doves that sit on the power lines and also roof tops. The day turned out to be great and the whole group was well satisfied with what they saw and experienced. Our group of 15 managed an impressive 72 species for the day. A complete list of participants and bird species are to follow.

Photo by John Adair

Participants: Stuart Sweetman, Shawn Dash, Walter and Gwen Harris,Tom Charlock, John, Thomas and Travis Hogan, John and Marilyn Adair, Ellis and Wendy Maxey, Dianne Snyder, Elizabeth Wilkins and Jacques Van Montfrans.

Complete species list for the day:

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ring-necked Duck
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Red-breasted Merganser
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Brown Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
White Ibis
Glossy Ibis

Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Red-tailed Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
American Oystercatcher
Sanderling
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Royal Turn
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Field Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
House Sparrow


FIELD TRIP REPORT - Saturday, February 27, 2016 - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel Islands, Willis Wharf and Brownsville Seaside Farm - by Stuart Sweetman

The February field trip of the HRBC was our winter trip to the CBBT islands and The Eastern Shore of Virginia. The winter trip to the CBBT is when we visit the restricted islands # 2 ,3 and 4. This winter trip has grown in popularity so much that I had to remove my 15 person limit and open it up to two groups of 15 people this year. This is one of the hardest trips to organize since its popularity has grown and all the restrictions that need to be met up to 8 weeks prior to the trip. With all that it took to organize, the extra large group successfully met at the South toll plaza at 7:30 am as instructed. Names were checked and verified with our police escort.

Our motorcade of maybe 10 cars proceeded to island #2 to see the type of wintering waterfowl that inhabits the waters of the tunnel islands. Each stop at the three islands lasts up to one hour so we generally have plenty of time to see what we came for. This year it wasn't as cold as it was the year before but a guaranteed strong wind will always make it feel colder. We at least had bright sunshine which made our sought after species such as Harlequin and Long-tailed ducks that much more spectacular. We ended up with 10 or more duck species as well as the resident Harbor Seals at the tunnel islands.

Harlequin Duck, Photo by John Adair

Harbor Seal, Photo by John Adair

The group left the islands an headed North for a pit stop at the visitors center on the south tip of the peninsula. Some of the group decided to proceed to the next stop and some headed home, well satisfied from what they had already seen. The second stop was at Willis Wharf in the town of Exmore, Va. Willis Wharf has become a popular location for one species in particular - the Marbled Godwit - and our group was not disappointed. The tide was high but it didn't deter the dozens of Godwits and Willets that gave us all good looks.

We recharged with sandwiches and snacks before heading to our third location of the day. The group left the wharf and headed South down Seaside Rd. to Brownsville Seaside Farm, which is the Headquarters of The Nature Conservancy's facilities on Virginia's Eastern Shore. This location was new for the group and it turned out to be a walking event. The sun was bright and the air had warmed into the 60's so there wasn't any complaints. This location had such diverse habitats ranging from wooded forest, tidal salt marshes and a brackish water pond. We were able to pick up some woodland species as well as a Northern Harrier working the marsh, but we felt this area would be best visited during migration season to be more productive. It was such a beautiful day and location that we didn't really care how productive it was. We left this spot knowing that it will be visited again by some and headed to our last stop of the day. Cape Charles was not to be seen today as the day grew short and stamina to continue had run out. Those of us left did manage to stop at the public island of the CBBT on our way back home. We picked up a couple new birds there, but we were thrilled to be able to watch a Canadian Submarine pass over the tunnel heading back out to sea. It was a perfect day for everyone who attended. We managed 65 species with 28 participants for the day. A complete list of participants and bird species are to follow.

Photo by John Adair

Participants: Stuart sweetman, Ken Lipshy, Geoff Giles, Bill Boeh, Tom Charlock, Michael Iwanik, Vickie Gullet, Harry and Rochelle Colestock, John and Marilyn Adair, Jessica Ausura, Ernie Miller, Justin Ausura, Jane Frigo, Anthony Nixon, Hayes and Joyce Williams, Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, Dave Youker, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jacques VanMontfrans, Richard Korpi, Phil Lehman, Lisa Billow, Patty VonOhlen, John and Kim Hogan.

Club member Ken Lipshy shot several short videos on the CBBT island field trip. Click the species name below to watch the video on YouTube.

Long-tailed Duck

Harlequin Ducks

Oystercatcher

Purple Sandpiper

Black Scoter

Harbor Seal

Complete species list for the day:

Canada Goose
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Harlequin Duck
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle

Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Killdeer
American Oystercatcher
Yellowlegs (sp)
Willet
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Purple Sandpiper
Dunlin
American Woodcock
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Marsh Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch


Click here for 2014-2015 reports

Click here for 2012-2013 reports

Click here for 2007-2011 reports

   
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