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Newport News Park

Sunday Morning Walks

 

 

Join us on the First and Third Sunday of each month at 7:00 AM at the parking lot behind the Ranger Station!

Thanks to Jane Frigo for providing these reports. For more information, contact Jane (757-873-0721).

2009 Walks


A winter snow storm hit the area the night before the December 20, 2009 walk, leaving several inches of snow on areas just north of the park.  Only an inch or so covered the park but temperatures were freezing and the ice and snow were still around this morning.  Rangers even had the road closed at the Ranger Station because of icy conditions.  Inspite of that, Richard Hudgins, Mike Lowry and Jane Frigo braved the elements and identified a decent number of species for the morning.  Killdeer were seen on the golf course just east of the Discovery Center along with a beautiful Red-tailed Hawk enjoying breakfast.  Several extremely large blackbird flocks were observed as were two unusually large flights of Canada Geese.  The Great Horned Owl was seen, too.  Notable misses were Northern Mockingbird, Brown Thrasher and Yellow-rumped Warbler.  A complete species list of the 43 species follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer

Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


December 6, 2009 was clear and calm early in the morning with winds increasing near the water.  Temperatures were in the 30's making it feel like the middle of winter.  Tom Charlock, Stuwart Sweetman, Nick Flanders, Bill Ferris, Eileen O'Toole, Marilyn and John Adair, Richard and Barbara Hudgins and Jane Frigo made up the morning's observers.  Forty-four species were seen and heard.  Bald Eagles were numerous and a pair of Great Horned Owls were observed at length.  Two pair of loon species were seen flying over.  Not one Yellow-rumped Warbler was seen and ducks were scare. Beaver activity was evident with one particularly large tree nearly severed.  A complete species follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Gadwall
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Loon species
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Killdeer

Ring-billed Gull
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Field Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


November 15, 2009 began with calm, sunny skies and temperatures in the upper 50's.  The recent Nor'easter left the area covered with fallen leaves and branches and evidence of high water marks.  The park road was closed at the Ranger Station and the morning walk was done entirely on foot.  John and Marilyn Adair, Richard and Barbara Hudgins, Nick Flanders, Dave Youker, Mike Lowry and Jane Frigo enjoyed the morning walk and were able to identify 53 species.  All 7 woodpeckers were seen.  At least 4 Bald Eagles were flying.  Tree Swallows were busy gathering insects over the water.  One lone Lesser Scaup was seen close to the bank but in general ducks were hard to find.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Gadwall
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush  FOS
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch


November 1, 2009 began with temperatures in the 50's and light drizzle.  Weather conditions continued to degrade ending with light showers.  Inspite of that 53 species were identified by Margaret Ware, Bill Ferris, Nick Flanders, Steven David, Mike Lowry, Jane Frigo, Marilyn and John Adair.  There were several  notable sightings.  A Bald Eagle was observed wearing two leg bands.  The right leg had an aluminum band with what appeared to be the numbers 699.  The left leg had a purple band that appeared to have the letter A and the number 5 or 6.  Double-crested Cormorants were gathered in a flock of nearly 200 in the weather and on the pipeline.  Three Lesser Scaup were cooperative allowing for excellent photographs to be taken by Mike Lowry.  The male and two female were close to the shore and in a tight group.  Finally, a rare sighting of a Pied-billed Grebe in flight was enjoyed.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull

Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird

American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch


Sunday, October 18, 2009 was cold (50 F. and dropping), windy and wet.  Inspite of that 13 hardy souls perservered to tally 52 species.  Those attending included Marilyn and John Adair, Stewart Sweetman, Nick Flanders, Marc Nichols, Geoff Giles, Hong Trinh, Theu Le, Jane Frigo, newcomers Carolyn and Bill Ferris and New Mexico visitors Sandy and Dick Conway. Sandy and Dick had a list of target birds they hoped to add to their life list.  They were able to successfully see five new birds, but sadly were unable to see a Piliated Woodpecker, just hear one calling in the distance. Hopefully they succeeded later in their visit.  If not they must return again on a better day.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker--heard
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
American Goldfinch


Because of the Fall Folk Festival in the park, the Sunday, October 4, 2009 bird walk was held in the campsite area across the reservoir.  The day was perfect--temperatures in the 60's, skies calm and clear.  Eleven birders gathered at 7 AM:  Nick Flanders, Marc Nichols, Elisa Enders, Tom Charlock, Richard Hudgins, Mike Lowry, Jeff Giles, Dave Youker, Marilyn and John Adair and Jane Frigo.  Walking from the campsite office to the archery range and on to the power lines produced 41 species.  The most abundant species was American Robin.  Woodpeckers put on a good show.  Sadly no Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was spotted.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Laughing Gull
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Blue Jay
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin

Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Northern Parula
Pine Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Common Yellowthroat
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Common Grackle 


September 20, 2009 began with perfect fall weather.  The skies were clear and the temperature comfortably cool.  Twelve birders showed up to see what fall migration had to bring.  Some just couldn't manage to stop looking on such a beautiful day and stayed until nearly 1 PM and walking all the way to the Swamp Bridge.  Those participating some time during that time included John and Marilyn Adair, Mike Lowry, Tom Charlock, Phyllis Roth, Hong Trinh, Theu Le, Harry Carlson, Richarad Hudgins, Marc Nichols, Betsy Garrett and Jane Frigo. Red-headed Woodpeckers, both immature and adult, were very abundant.  Hong asked to see some "big" birds and was treated to great views of a Red-tailed Hawk, Great Horned Owl and Turkey Vulture.  43 species were noted.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Laughing Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl

Chimney Swift
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Gray Catbird

Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Parula
Pine Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Common Grackle
Baltimore Oriole
American Goldfinch


Fall was in the air and migration has begun. Sixteen birders came out to see what's moving on this September 6, 2009 walk.  They included Jeff Giles, Mike Lowry, Marc Nichols, Richard Roundtree, Theu Le, Hong Trinh, Eileen O'Toole, Nick Flanders, Richard Hudgins, Margaret Ware, Libby Carmines, Betsy Garrett, Tom Charlock, Jane Frigo and Teri and Cathy Bond.  The group was able to identify 51 species, most of which were seen.  Misses for the day were Brown Thrasher, House and Chipping Sparrow. Great views were had of Red-eyed Vireo, Northern Parula, and American Redstart.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Laughing Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Veery
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starliing
Northern Parula
Pine Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch


This morning, August 16, 2009, the skies were clear but the air heavy with moisture from previous days heavy rains. The "dog days of summer" seemed to have arrived and things were quiet. A notable omission again was Canada Goose.  Other species missed included Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and House Wren.  The highlight of the morning was a Great Horned Owl that put on quite a show sitting at length in the sun.  Those present to enjoy the morning were John Steinbauch, Mike Lowry, Tom Charlock, Richard Hudgins, Margaret Ware, Eileen O'Toole, Marc Nichols, Eleanor Young, Diane Mrva, Nicolas Ferree, Grace Ferree and Jane Frigo.  Forty-five species were identified. A complete species list follows.

Wood Duck
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Laughing Gull
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Great Horned Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Purple Martin
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow 


The dog days of summer have arrived on Sunday August 2, 2009.  This morning skies were overcast, the air was muggy and the temperature was already nearly 80 degrees.  In spite of that  there were still great experiences on the morning's walk.  Nick Flanders, Margaret Ware, Tom Charlock, Mike Lowry, John Steinbauch and Jane Frigo tallied 50 species.  Highlights included two Great Horned Owls behind the Japanese Tea House, a Scarlet Tanager in the Arboretum, several pairs of spotted fawns and a very cooperative Blue Grosbeak that serenaded the group at the Discovery Center.  There was also a flyover of three Greater Yellowlegs and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo.  All three mimics--Gray Catbird, Northern Mockingbird and Brown Thrasher.  A notable omission for the morning was Canada Goose and Green Heron!  A complete species list follows.

Wood Duck
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Greater Yellowlegs
Laughing Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Great Horned Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird

American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Pine Warbler
Scarlet Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch


At last a perfect Sunday morning on July 16, 2009!  The sun was shining for once and the temperature was perfect--in the 70's.  Tom Charlock, Nick Flanders, Marc Nichols, Richard Hudgins, Mike Lowry, John Steinbaugh, Jane Frigo, Ben and Mary Copeland took advantage of the beautiful day and turned out for the day's walk.  58 species were identified--51 seen and 7 heard.  The group visited the Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest but did not see the bird on the nest.  Mike Lowry got a picture of it through his scope.  The other notable  sighting was of a female Summer Tanager bathing in one of the streams.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Laughing Gull
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren

House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Pine Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow


The Sunday walk on July 5, 2009 began with overcast skies, no wind and temperatures in the seventies. Nick Flanders, Richard Hudgins and Jane Frigo turned out for the walk. The group tallied 58 species--47 seen. Wood Ducks were abundant in the cloudy weather--29 counted. A Green Heron and Louisiana Waterthrush were observed at lenght at the Spawning Pond. An Orchard Oriole was seen singing and then flying to a nest near the second platform of the Swamp Bridge. The highlight, however, was a Ruby-throated Hummingbird sitting on a nest just past Post 16 on the Swamp Bridge Trail. A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck 
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Killdeer
Laughing Gull
Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Wood Thrush

American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Northern Parula
Pine Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch


The torrid humidity of the previous day limited the attendance at the June 21, 2009, Sunday Bird Walk in Newport News Park, but Margaret, Phil, Tom Charlock, Richard Hudgins, and Mark Nichols enjoyed a summer solstice of reduced dewpoint and a count of 51 species.  Insect eaters like the Great-crested Flycatcher were especially active near the bridge behind the Ranger Station.  Marc Nichols later used a spotting scope to identify a female Wood Duck with young (but no daddy - on Father's Day!) afloat in the distant, green muck.  Above-water speedsters included Swallow (Barn and Tree), Chimney Swift ("cigar with wings"), and a small flock of excited
Killdeer.

Acadian Flycatcher
American Crow
American Goldfinch
American Robin
Bald Eagle
Barn Swallow
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Blue Jay
Brown-headed Cowbird
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Thrasher
Canada Goose
Carolina Chickadee
Carolina Wren
Chimney Swift
Chipping Sparrow
Common Grackle

Downy Woodpecker
Double-crested Cormorant
Eastern Bluebird
Eastern Pewee
European Starling
Fish Crow
Great Blue Heron
Great Crested Flycatcher
Great Egret
Green Heron
House Wren
Indigo Bunting
Killdeer
Laughing Gull
Mallard
Morning Dove
Mute Swan

Northern Cardinal
Northern Flicker
Northern Mockingbird
Osprey
Pileated Woodpecker
Pine Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-eyed Vireo
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Summer Tanager
Tree Swallow
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
White-breasted Nuthatch
Wood Duck
Yellow-billed Cuckoo


At last the weather gave us a break on Sunday, June 7, 2009.  Skies were mostly sunny, temperatures perfect and winds calm.  Tom Charlock, Marc Nichols, Eileen O'Toole, Mike Lowry, Diane Mrva, Nicolas and Grace Ferree and Jane Frigo made the most of the morning. Prothonotory Warblers were abundant and gave breathtaking views.  Great Crested Flycatchers, Brown Thrashers and Blue-gray Gnatcatchers were also easy to see.  The group spent some time watching an Acadian Flycatcher on it's nest.   Mike, Marc and Jane extended the walk all the way to the Swamp Bridge.  They were able to add Scarlet Tanager, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Parula, Yellow-throated Vireo, Eastern Phoebe and numerous Green Heron to the list.  A complete list follows--55 species.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Pied-billed Grebe
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Red-tailed Hawk
Mourning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird

Wood Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Parula
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Ovenbird
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


Mike Lowry, Margaret Ware, George Roundtree, John Porter, Tom Charlock, Richard Hudgins, Jane Frigo, Mike, Terry and Bryce Cuthriell all came out to the park this morning, May 17, 2009, with high hopes of seeing some great birds!  The weather this month, however, has been most uncooperative.  Steady rain moved in and forced a halt to the day's walk by 8 AM.  The species list is rather short, but all enjoyed watching a Pine Warbler gathering nesting material and frantically working to complete her nest and a Carolina Chickadee feeding young.  A complete list of the 22 species follows.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Great Blue Heron
Osprey
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee

Great Crested Flycatcher
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Pine Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


In spite of the fog, birding at the park was quite exciting forthis morning's walk on May 3, 2009.  Eileen O'Toole, Cathy Bond, Elisa Enders, George Roundtree, Richard Hudgins, Dave Youker, Mel Pettard and Jane Frigo were able to spot over 60 species.  Some outstanding sightings included Spotted Sandpiper, Northern Waterthrush, Marsh Wren, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Summer and Scarlet Tanager, a possible Rusty Blackbird, Indigo Bunting and a female Blue Grosbeak.  Other FOS included Green Heron, Eastern Kingbird and Eastern Wood-Pewee.  Wood Ducks were abundant and mixed among them was a late pair of Gadwall.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Spotted Sandpiper
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Mourning Dove
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-headed Woodpecker
'Red-bellied Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee

Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern  Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Northern Parula

Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
Common Yellowthroat
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird--possible
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow


Sunday, April 5, 2009, was PERFECT for bird watching. Tom Charlock, Jim Harrison, Richard and Barbara Hudgins, Mel Pettard, Nick Flanders, Elisa Enders, Mike Lowry, Marc Nichols, Eileen O'Toole, Cathy Bond, and Jane Frigo counted 67 species! Several winter residents were still around including a Winter Wren, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Brown Creeper, Gadwall, Red-breasted Merganser and American Wigeon. FOS arrivals were a male Purple Martin and several Blue-gray Gnatcathers. The best bird was a Broad-winged Hawk flyover! A Great Horned Owl was seen near the Japanese Tea House. Following the regular walk, Mike Lowry, Marc Nichols, Eileen O'Toole and Jane Frigo went in search of the Painted Bunting reported off of Witch Duck Road in Virginia Beach. The female bunting was seen but no sign of the male.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Mallard
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk*
Red-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Royal Tern
Mourning Dove

Great Horned Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern  Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
American Goldfinch


The early switch to Day-light Savings Time, coupled with the rainy weather made for a very dark beginning to the morning on March 15, 2009. However, as with most things, there were benefits to the situation.  Great Horned Owls could be heard calling to each other with their "Who's awake?"  "Me too."  Nick Flanders, Richard Hudgins, Mike Lowry and Jane Frigo persevered through the steady light rain and were able to identify 51 species over the morning.  FOS Laughing Gulls were heard and seen flying in mass through the low cloud cover. Wood Ducks and Green-winged Teal were observed, but no sign of the Red-head Duck.  Brown Thrashers were very vocal in the Arboretum.  A Hairy Woodpecker gave a good show, but no Downy could be found.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Green-winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull

Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
American Goldfinch 


What a difference a year makes! Last year's walk on March 2 yielded 62 species. Today's walk on March 1, 2009 yielded only 44 species. Phil Bogart, Nick Flanders, Richard Hudgins, Tom Charlock, Marc Nichols and Jane Frigo braved the 37 degree temperatures and dark, damp conditions.  They were rewarded with some interesting birds. Three Fox Sparrows were seen. At the Discovery Center, a pair of Red-tailed Hawks were seen coupling. 16 Tundra Swans were still present on the reservoir along with a beautiful pair of Redhead Ducks. Eagles were abundant with a pair of juveniles seen chasing each other and then joined by two adults. A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Ring-billed Gull
Mourning Dove

Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle


On Sunday, February 15, 2009, the morning was beautiful--crystal clear but cold and breezy.  Phil Bogart, Richard and Barbara Hudgins, Eileen O'Toole, Marc Nichols, Mike Lowry, Nick Flanders and Jane Frigo pulled out the handwarmers and set out to find the morning's treasures.  And a good morning it was.  Bald Eagles were showing off and that is always a treat.  Also, the ducks were in abundance.  Some time was spent watching a pair of Redhead 's as they fed and preened among the American Wigeons and Ring-necks.  Tundra Swans were also present.  Mike, Marc and Nick continued the morning walk by going to the Swamp Bridge.  They were able to add three species* to the morning's list.  A notable omission was Red-winged Blackbirds.  A total of 45 species were found.  A complete list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
American Black Duck*
Mallard
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle

Ring-billed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker*
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker 
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Pine Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow*
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Common Grackle


The morning was beautiful for our February 1, 2009, walk!  Richard Hudgins, Eileen O'Toole, Margaret Ware, Marc Nichols, Eleanor Young, Jane Frigo and newcomer Louis Johnson were up and ready to see some birds--but the birds seemed to be sleeping in.  The day as a whole was remarkably quiet--only 35 species identified.  Although ducks were in good numbers many reliable species were missing--like Eastern Bluebird, Northern Mockingbird, Downy Woodpecker and even European Starlings.  We shall see what the next walk has to offer in two weeks.  A complete species list follows.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Double Crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle
Ring-billed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch

Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
American Robin
Eastern Towhee
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
American Goldfinch


Winter was showing her fury on our January 18, 2009 walk!  Today's walk was under cold, cloudy skies complete with a few snow flakes.  Richard Hudgins, Mike Lowry, Nick Flanders and Jane Frigo braved the weather and tallied 47 species.  Hermit Thrushes put on quite a show and woodpeckers were busy.  At the Arboretum a  leucocitic Dark-eyed Junco was seen.  It foraged on the ground with many other Juncos and White-throated Sparrows.  Much of the reservoir was frozen so waterfowl were quite concentrated.  A group of 20 Tundra Swans were observed, along with Black Ducks, Gadwall, Hooded Mergansers, Mallards and lone Northern Shoveler.  Here is a complete species list.

Canada Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
American Black Duck
Mallard
Northern Shoveler
Hooded Merganser
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull

Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Wren
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren

Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
American Goldfinch


The new year began on a good note with our first walk of 2009 on January 4, 2009!  Rain did not materialize as predicted and Richard Hudgins, Barbara Hudgins, Marc Nichols, Margaret Ware, Tom Charlock and Dave Youker enjoyed the morning finding 42 species.   Duck numbers were low but species numbers were fair.  A complete species list follows.

Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Mute Swan
Canada Goose
Mallard
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Ring-necked Duck
Hooded Merganser
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Ring-billed Gull
Rock Pigeon

Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Blue Jay
American Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren

Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Cardinal
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch