The Club has monthly field trips from September through May

Future Trips

Grandview Beach

 

Sunday, November 13, 2022 

Leader: James Abbott   7:00 - 11:00 AM

On Sunday November 13th the HRBC field trip will be at one of our traditional birding hotspots, Grandview Beach (2 Adriatic Dr, Hampton, VA 23664). We will gather at the entrance at 7am. This is a walking heavy field trip and scopes are a good idea. As always I will have mine with me. Participants can walk as much for the beach as they feel comfortable. It is about 1.6 miles to the overwash area. It is 3 miles to walk to the end at Factory Point. Dress for cooler temperatures due to wind on the beach. As always reach out to me at jaa3469@gmail.com or 7573209191. Include name in voicemails or text so I can add you to my contacts.

 

Dutch Gap Richmond Winter Waterfowl Birding Trip

 

December 11, 2022    7:30 AM - Noon

Leader: James Abbott

A new addition to the normal field trip calendar this year the HRBC will be heading to Dutch Gap Conservation Area on the James River in Richmond. One of the best winter hotspots for waterfowl in Virginia. We will meet at the parking area at 7:30am (341 Henricus Park Rd, Chester, VA 23836). We will do the wetland boardwalk at the entrance and then walk the impounded area of a former oxbow of the James River. The total walking distance for this trip will be comparable to Grandview ~5.5 miles. We will be at least going out along the east and south ends of the impoundment ~3 miles. Carpooling is a great idea. I will be returning home via route 5 and the colonial parkway with a stop at the JRA Williamsburg office. Contact me at jaa3469@gmail.com or 7573209191.

 

January 8th - York River Colonial Parkway

 

February 12th - Back Bay Tram

 

March 19th - Hog Island WMA

 

April 23rd - Dismal Swamp

 

May 7th - James River Parks Richmond

Past Field Trips

Eastern Shore Birding Trip

 

Sunday, October 16, 2022   7:00 - 11:00 AM  Optional extra trip up to Chincoteague NWR

Leader: James Abbott

On Sunday October 16th the HRBC held its traditional field trip to the Eastern Shore. A large group of birders met at the ESVA Welcome Center at 7am. We walked the trails at the ESVA National Wildlife Refuge. The morning was cool and overcast a the bird activity was very high. We encountered thousands of YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER and 20-30 AMERICAN KESTREL as well as other migrating raptors. Some late NORTHERN PARULA and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER were highlights. We had view of LITTLE BLUE HERON, WHITE IBIS and TRICOLORED HERON at the marsh overlook. We then continued by car up to the seaside town of Oyster, VA to walk the Horse Island Trail. We had perfect mid tides that concentrated the shorebirds on sporadic exposed oyster reefs. We had very high numbers 200-300 of both WILLET and AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER. We also had good flocks of SHORT BILLED DOWITCHER and DUNLIN. We had a group of flyover BLUE WINGED TEAL and a brief view of SALTMARSH SPARROW. The birds of the day were great looks at 3 MARBLED GODWIT and 4 WHIMBREL with one of them foraging in the marsh at extremely close range.

 

A small faction continued up to Chincoteague NWR. We walked the Woodland Trail and drove the Wildlife Loop. We encountered early winter visitors in RED BREASTED NUTHATCH, DARK EYED JUNCO, and YELLOW BELLIED SAPSUCKER as well as two late warbler species OVENBIRD and CAPE MAY. On the Wildlife Loop group members viewed GREEN WINGED TEAL, AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, PEREGRINE FALCON and WHITE RUMPED SANDPIPER. The group stopped at Blank Narrows Brewing Company in Chincoteague to try their Longleaf IPA made with longleaf needles from Piney Grove Preserve. The can artwork has a Red-cockaded Woodpecker. Total species 70.

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click  https://ebird.org/tripreport/72421

Shorebird Excursion to Back Bay NWR

Saturday, September 10, 2022   7:00 - 10:00 AM 

Leader: James Abbott

The HRBC September field trip was at Back Bay NWR on September 10th a group of 9 participants walked the Raptor Trail and the dikes out to C pool. We observed 48 species with some highlights being great looks at WILSONS SNIPE and KING RAIL. We had looks at SORA and PEREGRINE FALCON as well as BOBOLINK and SEASIDE SPARROW. The best bird was a female/young male PAINTED BUNTING.

Field Trip to Hog Island

Saturday, April 23, 2022 7:00 AM

Leader: James Abbott

The Hampton Roads Bird Club April Field Trip was at Hog Island on Saturday the 23rd. Our group of seven birders met at 7am and headed through the gate into Hog Island. WE tallied 62 species between 7am and noon. We had great views of ORCHARD ORIOLE, PRAIRIE WARBLER, and GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER. We also had exciting close views of WHITE_EYED VIREO breeding behavior. We saw one WEVI nest under construction and one complete nest with a bird incubating eggs. BALD EAGLE numbers were very high and active and we flushed two BOBWHITE QUAIL. Despite higher water levels, we did have some shorebirds including both YELLOWLEGS and LEAST SANDPIPER. The best bird of the day was the pair of BLACK-NECKED STILT towards the end of the main road.

 

Full Species List:

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

American Black Duck

Northern Bobwhite

Pied-billed Grebe

Mourning Dove

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Black-necked Stilt

Killdeer

Least Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

Lesser Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs

Laughing Gull

Least Tern

Caspian Tern

Royal Tern

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Phoebe

White-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tree Swallow

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Gray Catbird

Brown Thrasher

Northern Mockingbird

American Goldfinch

Orchard Oriole

Red-winged Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Common Grackle

Black-and-White Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Northern Cardinal

Indigo Bunting

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Field Trip to York River Side of Colonial Parkway

Sunday, March 13, 2022

Leader: James Abbott

The March field trip will be on the York River side of the Colonial Parkway. This will be our last chance at migrating waterfowl as they move back north. We will meet at the Target off 199 ( 200 Marquis Pkwy, Williamsburg, VA 23185). We will caravan down the parkway stopping at pull offs all the way to Yorktown Beach. We will meet at 7am. You can text or email me at (757)3209191 or jaa3469@gmail.com to let me know you intend to join or if you need to reach me the day of the trip.

Field Trip to Grandview Nature Preserve

Saturday, February 12, 2022: 7:30 AM

Leader: James Abbott

The Hampton Roads Bird Club had its February field trip on the 12th at Grandview Beach in Hampton, Virginia. Weather was cool in the morning but warmed up to the 60s with plenty of sun. There were good numbers of expected waterfowl and shorebird species present with the highlights being several COMMON GOLDENEYE, a female LONG_TAILED DUCK and large rafts of REDHEAD off in the Bay. We had an impressive number of NORTHERN GANNET in close feeding on a school of bait fish. There were 36 species seen.

Canada Goose

Mallard

Redhead

Lesser Scaup

Scaup Sp

Surf Scoter

Black Scoter

Long-tailed Duck

Bufflehead

Common Goldeneye

Hooded Merganser

Horned Grebe

Mourning Dove

Tree Swallow

Black-bellied Plover

Ruddy Turnstone

Sanderling

Dunlin

Herring Gull

Great-black backed Gull

Ring-billed Gull

 Red-throated Loon

Common Loon

Northern Gannet

Double-crested Cormorant

Brown Pelican

Black Vulture

Bald Eagle

Carolina Wren

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Yellow-rumped Warbler

White-throated Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Field Trip to Fort Manroe

Saturday, November 27, 2021: 8:00 AM

Leader: James Abbott

 

The Hampton Roads Bird Club had its November field trip on the 27th at Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA. Weather was cold but clear. Our group met at the Phoebus Waterfront Park and drove to serval locations on the fort and walked the bay wall. Winter activity was just picking up as we observed  BUFFLEHEAD and HORNED GREBE along side BROWN PELICAN. The first NORTHERN GANNET have started to arrive along with COMMON LOON. Our best birds of the day were a RUDDY TURNSTONE in a flock of SANDERLING on the rock jetty at Outlook Beach and a SEDGE WREN in a grassy tangle at the very northern tip of the fort past the campground. Species List: 36

Bufflehead

Horned Grebe

Rock Pigeon

Mourning Dove

Ruddy Turnstone

Sanderling

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull

Great Black-backed Gull

Forster’s Tern

Common Loon

Northern Gannet

Double-crested Cormorant

Brown Pelican

Great Blue Heron

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk

Bald Eagle

Belted Kingfisher

American Crow

Fish Crow

Sedge Wren

Northern Mockingbird

Eastern Bluebird

American Goldfinch

White-throated Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Meadowlark

Red-winged Blackbird

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Northern Cardinal

Eastern Shore Birding Sites Trip

Saturday October 23, 2021: 6:30 AM

Leader: James Abbott

The Hampton Roads Bird Club had its October field trip on the 23rd of October in Northampton County on the the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

Weather was in the 60s with a cloudy morning that gave way to sun by noon. There was a significant flight of migrating birds the night before. Our group met at the Eastern Shore Visitor center and walked the trails at the National Wildlife Refuge. There was a lot of activity and the best birds at this site were great looks at a BLACKPOLL WARBLER and a flock of migrating TUNDRA SWAN. We also had BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER and NORTHERN PARULA. We moved on to the town of Oyster, VA and the marsh side trail. High water limited the shorebird activity but we enjoyed great looks at TRICOLORED HERON, AMERICAN BITTERN, SALTMARSH SPARROW, and CLAPPER RAIL. Our last stop was at the Ned Brinkley Preserve at the Cheriton landfill pond. They have done a really nice job here with the parking lot and a wonderful viewing blind at the pond. We had a lot of waterbirds including; BLACK_CROWNED NIGHT HERON and LITTLE BLUE HERON along with some early RUDDY DUCK and RING-NECKED DUCK. Two special notes; on the way to the meeting location in the morning myself and Ryan flushed 3 AMERICAN WOODCOCK on Arlington Chase Rd and the GOLDEN EAGLE reported by the hawk watch at 10:50 was refound along highway 13 feeding on a deer carcass and viewed by group members.

 

Species List: 83

 

Canada Goose

Tundra Swan

Gadwall

Green-winged Teal

Ring-necked Duck

Ruddy Duck

Pied-billed Grebe

Rock Pigeon

Mourning Dove

Clapper Rail

American Woodcock

Laughing Gull

Great-black Backed Gull

Herring Gull

Royal Tern

tern sp.

Common Loon

Double-crested Cormorant

Brown Pelican

American Bittern

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Snowy Egret

Little Blue Heron

Tricolored Heron

Black-crowned Night-Heron

White Ibis

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Golden Eagle

Northern Harrier

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Peregrine Falcon

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren

House Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Swainson’s Thrush

American Robin

Gray Catbird

Brown Thrasher

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

American Goldfinch

Yellow-breasted Chat

Eastern Meadowlark

Red-winged Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Parula

Blackpool Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Palm Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Northern Cardinal                                                                       Photos by Pete Peterman

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Saltmarsh Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Comments from the outing.

Thank you Pete, great photos. A couple notes, the eagle pictured is a 1st cycle bald eagle. No golden eagle will have that much body white. The juvenile golden visiting the carcass is almost all dark with faint white patches on the under wing and a thick brown tail band with less defined white. There is also tawny feathers on the nape of the neck. If you have any other photos of birds from the carcass, look through them for these characteristics.

 

This is a great photo of the saltmarsh sparrow! I sent this photo over to a colleague of mine who works on a marsh sparrow banding project at UNCW and she confirmed this as a saltmarsh sparrow. However she said this individual sparrow is an interesting one. Nelson’s and Saltmarsh were lumped as Sharp-tailed sparrow before being split. The now two species do hybridize and they have been studying this. She says that this individual definitely is showing traits of “Nelson’s” genetics. She cited the the presence of the orange bib like in Nelsons but it is uneven and inconsistent on this individual unlike a classic Nelson’s. She also cited the heavy streaking characteristic of “Saltmarsh” is slightly reduced on this individual.

James Abbott

Hog Island WMA Birding Site Trip

Sunday, September 12, 2021; 7:00 AM

Leaders: James Abbott

 

The Hampton Roads Bird Club had its first fall excursion beyond the Peninsula on September 12 to Hog Island Wildlife Management Area. Weather was in the 70s with a SSW wind around 12mph. Participants included Christiana Wilson, Wendy and Ellis Maxey, Lesley Meng, Eric Mathews, Gary Wright, June Hartzler, Bill Boeh, Cindy Schulz, Dianne Snyder, Rex Holmlin, John and Marylin Adair, Pete and Charm Peterman, Ryan Walsh, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jacques van Montfrans, and Jeanette and Brian Weinberg.

 

 

 

 

HRBC at Hog Island (photo by Dianne Snyder)

 

Water levels were high in the impoundments which limited our shorebird opportunities but great looks at American White Pelican, Northern Harrier, American Redstart, and Bobwhite were the highlights. We also had a Tricolored Heron which is a good catch that far inland.

 

Species list for Hog Island (9/12/2021)

 

Mallard

American Black Duck

Northern Bobwhite

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Spotted Sandpiper

Laughing Gull

Great black-backed Gull

Caspian Tern

Royal Tern

Forster’s Tern

Double-crested Cormorant

American White Pelican

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Snowy Egret

Tricolored Heron

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Northern Harrier

Bald Eagle

Belted Kingfisher

 

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Eastern Phoebe

White-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

Fish Crow

American Crow

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

European Starling

Bobolink

Red-winged Blackbird

Pine Warbler

Palm Warbler

American Redstart

Common Yellowthroat

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

 

All participants must have identification to pass through the gate. They are serious about this, I have seen people arrive to a walk unable to participate. Most of the time it was because they rode with other people and did not bring their drivers license. We will drive the two mile access road stopping at various points along the way. We can also walk around the impoundment areas for more viewing. Participants can walk as much as they feel comfortable with.

 

We will plan to meet at the entrance gate around 7:00am. There is a parking area on the right and in front of the guard house. All cars that will be entering the WMA will be subject to an inspection since we will be driving through Dominion's Surry Nuclear Power Plant to access Hog Island. You can search (Hog Island Wildlife Management Area) in Google Maps or use these GPS coordinates to the parking lot:

37.163174, -76.700857

 

My email is jaa3469@gmail.com and my cell number is 7573209191: email me or leave me a message if you intend to join

Results of the York River State Park Birding Sites Trip

Saturday, May 8, 2021

Leaders: Harry and Rochelle Colestock

 

Jane Frigo and Marilyn and John Adair met up with the Colestocks at the visitors’ center at 8:15 on a lovely Saturday morning.  The area near the center was busy with Eastern Bluebirds, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, a Northern Mockingbird, Tufted Titmice, a Great Crested Flycatcher, Indigo Buntings and a Blue Grosbeak, which posed very nicely at the top of a tree.  Jane was first to spot two Cedar Waxwings.  The river overlook provided views of a Bald Eagle, Ospreys and 4 Ruddy Ducks that hadn’t yet flown north with their companions.

The pond area was fairly quiet except for the Great Blue Heron rookery, which had about a dozen herons in residence.  Nearby we spotted an Indigo Bunting and Brown Thrashers and heard Blackpoll Warblers and a Common Yellowthroat.

The trail through the woods yielded lots of bird sounds, but not many good views of Red-eyed Vireos, Yellow-throated Warblers, Carolina Wrens, Black-throated Blue Warblers, Ovenbirds, a Pileated Woodpecker, a Yellow-throated Vireo, a Blue-headed Vireo, Northern Parulas, and a Downy Woodpecker, among others.  Two birds that we got good looks at were a Summer Tanager and Ruby-throated Hummingbird.  We also had close, fleeting views of an Acadian Flycatcher that seemed to be following us along the trail.

The drive back out of the park afforded more opportunities to see and hear multiple bird species.

Ruddy Duck

Mourning Dove

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Laughing Gull

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Blue-headed Vireo

Purple Martin

Barn Swallow

Cedar Waxwing

American Goldfinch

Brown-headed Cowbird

Black-and-white Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Blue Grosbeak

Red-shouldered Hawk

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

White-eyed Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

American Crow

Fish Crow

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Carolina Wren

Northern Mockingbird

Chipping Sparrow

Eastern Towhee

Yellow-breasted Chat

Ovenbird

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Parula

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Scarlet Tanager

Indigo Bunting

Osprey

Red-bellied Woodpecker

08 May 2021

Downy Woodpecker

Blue Jay

Tufted Titmouse

European Starling

Brown Thrasher

Eastern Bluebird

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Results of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge birding sites trip

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Leaders: Harry and Rochelle Colestock

The Colestocks met up with Bill Boeh, Dave Brown and Pete Peterman at 07:30 at the Jericho Ditch parking area.  It was a lovely sunny morning with temperatures just right for birding.  We set off to walk Lynn Ditch where Prairie Warblers were in abundance. We also saw or heard (mostly heard, due to the thick foliage) multiple White-eyed Vireos, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Prothonotaries, Northern Parulas and Red-bellied Woodpeckers.  Two surprises were a flock of Cedar Waxwings and a flying Wood Duck.  Next, we ventured a bit down Jericho, Hudnell and Williamson trails, which were much quieter than Lynn Ditch.  Among the birds we saw or heard were Common Yellowthroats, Eastern Towhees, Great Crested Flycatchers, Yellow-throated Warblers and a Louisiana Waterthrush.

On the way back out on Jericho Ditch Road, we made multiple stops to see or hear a Hooded Warbler, a Black and White Warbler, Swainson’s Warblers, Marsh Wrens, Yellow-throated Warblers and a flock of Rusty Blackbirds—the “bird of the day”.

On the way to Washington Ditch along White Marsh Road we saw Eastern Meadowlarks, a Red-shouldered Hawk and a Kestrel.  On Washington Ditch road we heard an Ovenbird.  The boardwalk provided another Ovenbird, a Pileated Woodpecker, Prothonotary, Palm and Hooded Warblers, Gt. Crested Flycatchers and a big surprise: we heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo. 

By the time we started walking down the road towards Lake Drummond, it was close to noon and getting warm, so we did not go very far past the downed trees.  The last few birds were Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Black and White Warblers, a Red-headed Woodpecker, more Prothonotaries and, finally, a Belted Kingfisher.  We all agreed that it had been a good morning for birding. The full list of species seen was:

American Crow

American Kestrel

American Robin

Belted Kingfisher

Black Vulture

Black-and-white Warbler

Blue Jay

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Brown Thrasher

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Wren

Cedar Waxwing

Chipping Sparrow

Common Grackle

Common Yellowthroat

Double-crested Cormorant

Downy Woodpecker

Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Towhee

European Starling

Fish Crow

Great Blue Heron

Great Crested Flycatcher

Great Egret

Hooded Warbler

Louisiana Waterthrush

Marsh Wren

Mourning Dove

Northern Cardinal

Northern Flicker

Northern Parula

Ovenbird

Palm Warbler

Pileated Woodpecker

Pine Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-shouldered Hawk

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Rusty Blackbird

Swainson's Warbler

Tufted Titmouse

Turkey Vulture

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-eyed Vireo

White-throated Sparrow

Wood Duck

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Results of the  Virginia Beach Birding Sites Trip

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Leaders: Harry and Rochelle Colestock

It was another cold, windy morning when four intrepid birders (Dave Youker, Bill Boeh, the Colestocks) met at Little Island Park Saturday morning.  The ocean was choppy, but we got glimpses of Horned Grebes, American Oystercatchers, Razorbills, Surf Scoters, Red-throated and Common Loons, and Red-breasted Mergansers.  Northern Gannets and Brown Pelicans soared over the water in the morning sunlight.  Double-crested Cormorants, Great Black-backed Gulls and Ring-billed Gulls clustered on the beach while a bevy of female Boat-tailed Grackles lined the pier.  Away from the beach, birds were not in abundance; but we saw or heard Killdeer, Northern Mockingbird, Fish Crow, Yellow-rumps and a Gray Catbird, among others.

The next stop was Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The wind seemed to be hindering much bird activity, with Robins being the most common bird on the trails.  Other sightings included a Northern Harrier, Kingfisher, Marsh Wren, Song Sparrow, Osprey, Bald Eagle and Yellow-rumps.  Another hike to the beach revealed Sanderlings, more Gannets, Razorbills, Loons, Grebes and RB Mergansers.

Next, we tried the Harris Teeter retention pond, which had good results in recent weeks, but not when we went.  A pair of Mallards swam in the pond and a beautiful Red-tailed Hawk soared over the fields.  Field and Song Sparrows were seen or heard, along with a Flicker, Fish Crow and Carolina Wren.

Nearby at Sherwood Lakes had more water birds.  We got a close view of a Kingfisher near the entrance and a distant view of an immature Bald Eagle.   Red-breasted Mergansers, Ring-billed Gulls and a Common Loon were spotted on the lake.  Incidental sightings included Song Sparrows and a Mockingbird.  At that point, we concluded the trip and headed home. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sylvan Heights Bird Park Birding

Saturday, February 20, 2021

Leaders: Harry and Rochelle Colestock

•Sign-up:  Please contact Harry or Rochelle Colestock at hcolesto@hotmail.com if you intend on going on this trip.  We will only need additional information if there are more than 30 people interested.

 

•Timing: The park will be open from 9 AM to 4 PM.  Attendees can work their own schedule.  We will not be going as group.  Please check the Sylvan Heights Bird Park website at www.shwpark.com for ticket prices and much additional information on this unique bird facility.  Note the dining information on the site if you are looking for facilities in the area.

 

• Walking the trails of the park should take about two hours.

 

•Social distancing and other health maintenance items related to COVID-19 are found also in the facility website.

 

Results of the Field Trip to Beaver Dam Park

 

Saturday, January 16, 2021

Leaders: Harry and Rochelle Colestock

 

The weather cooperated with us with clear, calm conditions with temperatures in the 40’s.  These conditions helped us look at great distance over the water to find Ruddy Ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Buffleheads, Ringed-Necked Ducks, Canvasbacks, and a large number of Pied-Billed Grebes and Coots.  Many of the ducks that had originally migrated to Beaverdam pond areas this season have been leaving for other areas in the past six weeks, so we were lucky to see the variety still left in the area. Naturally, we were welcomed in the parking lot by resident Muscovy Ducks.  Several Bald Eagles and a Red-Shouldered Hawk also made appearances. 

After spending a lot of time on the water birds, we ventured on the trails.  By this time, the sun had started to warm up the forest and numerous bird species were vocalizing and feeding in the trees, brush piles, and ground areas.  These species included Juncos; Yellow-Bellied Sapsuckers; Brown Thrasher; Downy, Red-Bellied, Hairy, and Pileated Woodpeckers; Eastern Phoebe; and Ruby-Crowned Kinglet.  As we continued on trails near the water, it was clear that the rainfall in the last six months had saturated the soil and there were numerous water and muddy patches along the way. 

 

Following the trip conclusion, Cindy Schulz invited participants to visit her home at which a small flock of Evening Grosbeaks have been feeding for several days.  This showing capped a day in which we identified 38 other species.

Canada Goose

Muscovy Duck (dom.)

Mallard

Canvasback

Ring-necked Duck

Lesser Scaup

Bufflehead

Hooded Merganser

Ruddy Duck

Pied-billed Grebe

American Coot

Ring-billed Gull

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Black Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

 Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Brown Thrasher

Northern Mockingbird

Eastern Bluebird

Dark-eyed Junco

White-throated Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Northern Cardinal

2021 Dismal Swamp Trip group.JPG