Sunday Morning Bird Walks
Newport News City Park

Join us on the First and Third Sunday of each month at 7:00 AM at Newport News Park. 

Meet us in the parking lot behind the Ranger Station!

Thanks to Jane Frigo for providing these reports.  For more information, contact Jane (757-873-0721).

2022 Bird Walks Summary

September 4, 2022

September 18, 2022 was a beautiful fall day and perfect for spending time outdoors during migration.  A large group shared that feeling with 16 people participating in the morning walk.  They were Pete Peterman, Bill Boeh, Cindy Schulz, Marc Nichols, Dianne Snyder, Kate Schaller, Stuart Sweetman, Heidi Young, Melissa Freudenberg, Lindsey Van Zandbergen, Jane Frigo, and newcomers Jaime Joy, Emily Grojean,Wiki West and Beata and Chip Whitehead.  The group identified 48 species which were better than the last walk.  Outstanding sightings included a pair of Barred Owls near Swamp Point, Northern Waterthrush, Black-and-white Warbler, American Redstart and Veery.  Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were still around, A pair of Wood Ducks were heard and then flushed up at the Swamp Bridge.  All six woodpeckers were seen with quite a show put on by dueling Pileated and Red-headed Woodpeckers. One miss was the common House Finch.  A complete species list is below.   A SPECIAL NOTE......the next walk will be meeting at the Campground because of the scheduled festival at the main park.  

 

Canada Goose*

Wood Duck

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Mourning Dove

Barred Owl

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker 

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

White-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Carolina Wren

Eastern Bluebird

Veery

American Robin

Gray Catbird

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Northern Waterthrush

Black-and-white Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

American Redstart

Northern Parula

Pine Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

American Goldfinch

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click  https://ebird.org/tripreport/72419

September 4, 2022

Hopes were high for a great birding day with fall migrants possible. However, September 4, 2022 was disappointing.  The weather was clear, calm and not too warm.  There were 14 participants:  John and Marilyn Adair, Marc Nichols, Ellis Maxey, Dianne Snyder, Heidi Young, Cindy Schulz, Todd Trousdell,  Hannah Montalvo, Sue Tomlin, Sandy Graham, Jane Frigo and first timers Jackie Trickel and Jenny Devasher,  Yet the group was only able to identify 41 species during the morning.  The only migrant warbler spotted was a Cape May Warbler seen by Marc Nichols.  Most of the group was able to get a fairly good sighting.  After the first stop the group opted to try the Arboretum for more warblers but with not much luck.  The group then tried Stable Road and that too was disappointing.  The group then moved onto the Discovery Center. There the group got the bird of the day.   A group of 5 Bobolinks were seen!  Other birds there included a pair of Blue Grosbeaks and a Summer Tanager.  The majority of the group dropped off then but Heidi, John and Jane made the trek to the Swamp Bridge. They didn't find much for their efforts.  Hopefully the next walk will be better.  A list of sightings follows.

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click  https://ebird.org/tripreport/72418

 

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk*

Laughing Gull

Mourning Dove

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Red-bellied Woodpecker*

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker*

Pileated Woodpecker*

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

American Crow*

Fish Crow*

N. Rough-winged Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cape May Warbler

Pine Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Bobolink

Brown-headed Cowbird*

House Finch

American Goldfinch*

 

August 21, 2022

 

August 21, 2022 was a typical late summer day.  The weather was hot and humid with not a breath of air to provide relief.  Still quite a group braved the weather and identified 59 species, total.  Those participating were John and Marilyn Adair, Pete and Charm Peterman, Bill Boeh, Terry Moore, Cindy Schulz, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jacques van Montfrans, Tom Charlock, Todd Trousdell, Stuart Sweetman, Sue Tomlin, Jane Frigo and newcomer Kate Schaller.  The reservoir was covered with grass growth which brought in more shore birds than usual.   Terry Moore alerted us to look for Little Blue Heron he had seen earlier in the week.  The group was not disappointed.  Both adult and immature Little Blues were seen along with Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets.  It was a great opportunity to compare sizes, leg and bill color. Before long Solitary Sandpipers were seen flying along the shore and landing in the alcove  Several Belted Kingfishers joined the sandpipers.  All possible woodpeckers were seen, with both adult and immature Red-headed spotted.  Both White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireo were seen and heard along with a pair of Summer Tanagers.  No Common Yellowthroat, Northern Parula,  Prothonotary or Acadian Flycatchers were seen or heard.  Terry Moore broke away from the main group when they headed to the Swamp Bridge. He crossed the White Oak Trail Bridge and checked out the first overlook.  He was rewarded with seeing Spotted Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Northern Waterthrush more Kildeer, Belted Kingfishers and an Osprey. He was able to get some great photo's too. It was a wonderful morning.  A species list follows.  (remember * indicates heard only, ** will indicate species only seen by Terry)

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click https://ebird.org/tripreport/67879.

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Little Blue Heron

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk*

Red-tailed Hawk

Killdeer

Spotted Sandpiper**

Solitary Sandpiper

Greater Yellowlegs**

Least Sandpiper**

Laughing Gull

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

White-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

European Starling

Northern Waterthrush**

Pine Warbler*

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

House Finch

American Goldfinch

August 7, 2022

 

This summer has been hot and humid with heat indexes over 100 degrees.  August 7, 2022 was no different. The morning began with a temperature of 76 and no breeze!  Surprisingly 16 people braved the weather and participated in the morning walk.  They included John and Marilyn Adair, Pete and Charm Peterman, Elizabeth  Wilkins and Jacques van Montfrans, Bill Boeh, Grace Buskirk, Marc Nichols, Tom Charlock, Sue Tomlin, Heidi Young, Stuart Sweetman, Melissa Freudenberg, Lindsey Vansenyerger and Jane Frigo.  It truly was a banner day because the group saw BOTH owls!!!  They were located on the walk to the Swamp Bridge.  First, the Barred Owl was spotted near Swamp Point.  He has been seen there before and the group assumes a pair has established residency in that area.  For several participants it was their first glimpse of an owl in the wild.  As the group continued toward the bridge, Melissa spotted a BIG bird at the very top of a tree.  It turned out to be a Great Horned Owl.  John Adair was able to get his scope on it and all enjoyed seeing the ear tufts and piercing eyes.  Another outstanding experience was a Red-tailed Hawk being pursued by a pair of very unhappy Eastern Kingbirds.  A surprising miss for the morning was Canada Goose!  A total of 54 species were identified.  (* indicates heard only).

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click here: https://ebird.org/tripreport/67878

 

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Solitary Sandpiper

Laughing Gull

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Great Horned Owl

Barred Owl

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker*

Northern Flicker*

Pileated Woodpecker*

Eastern Wood Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher*

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow*

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch*

Brown-headed Nuthatch'

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Common Yellowthroat*

Eastern Towhee*

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager*

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

House Finch

American Goldfinch

 

July 18, 2022

 

Another bird walk was held at Newport News Park on July 17, 2022.  Participants knew it was summer when the temperature at 7 AM was already 75 degrees and only expected to continue rising during the morning.  To add to the misery the day was humid and winds were calm.  Still a nice sized group turned out.  They were Dianne Snyder, Tom Charlock, Bill Boeh, Stuart Sweetman, Sue Tomlin, Melissa Freudenberg, Heidi Young, Jane Frigo and Marilyn and John Adair.  A special note here...a huge THANK YOU to John Adair for his faithful participation and ever present scope. John carries his scope on all our walks and can focus it on anything!  He certainly adds to all participant's experiences.  There were some pluses and minuses in today's walk.  Misses included Bald Eagle, Northern Flicker, Prothonotary Warbler and Northern Parula.  Great sightings included Green Heron, Common Yellowthroat, Red-tailed Hawk and a young Eastern Towhee.  A list of the 53 species identified follows.

To see the corresponding eBird Trip Report, click here:  https://ebird.org/tripreport/65768

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Red-shouldered Hawk*

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker*

Downy Woodpecker*

Hairy Woodpecker*

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

White-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

NOrthern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Common Yellowthroat

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager*

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

 

July 3, 2022

 

The year is half over! July 3, 2022 at the park was calm, humid and warm, a typical summer day.  Those attending the bird walk were Tom Charlock, Dianne Snyder, Todd Trousdell, Stuart Sweetman, Marc Nichols, Hannah Montalvo, Sue Tomlin, Jane Frigo and Marilyn and John Adair.  The group identified 59 species!  All woodpeckers were identified with Red-headed and Northern Flicker by vocalization only.  Yellow-billed Cuckoo was another species heard but not seen.  An outstanding behavioral observation was captured at the Swamp Bridge.  A Prothonotary Warbler was seen and photographed feeding young in a nest cavity just feet off the boardwalk! Marc Nichols also had a surprising look at a Cliff Swallow over the water.  He is quite familiar with the species from his frequent trips birding in Walkerton where they are much more common.  All in all it was a great morning.  A complete species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo*

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker*

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker*

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher*

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

White-eyed Vireo*

Yellow-throated Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tree Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Prothonotary Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Parula*

Pine Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting 

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

June 19, 2022

June 19, 2022 was Father's Day.  The weather was beautiful with clear skies, a comfortable breeze and temperatures ranging from 65 to 75.  Those participating in the morning were Dianne Snyder, Bill Boeh, Stuart Sweetman, Tom Charlock, Marc Nichols, Lindsey Vanzarrberger, Sue Tomlin, Jane Frigo, John and Marilyn Adair and first timers Jessica and Brock Lascara.  The group identified 51 species for the morning.  There were several misses for the morning including Bald Eagle, Green Heron, Northern Parula, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Red-bellied Woodpecker and Pileated Woodpecker.  Twelve species were heard only.  Good sightings of Indigo Bunting, Blue Grosbeak and Eastern Bluebird were enjoyed as well as Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks.  A complete species list follows. (remember * indicated heard only)

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Cooper's Hawk

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Chimney Swift

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Eastern Wood Pewee*

Acadian Flycatcher*

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird*

Yellow-throated Vireo*

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

Fish Crow* 

Purple Martin

swallow species?

Carolina Chickadee*

Tufted Titmouse*

White-breasted Nuthatch*

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Prothonotary Warbler*

Common Yellowthroat*

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-throated Warbler*

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird*

Orchard Oriole

House Finch

American Goldfinch

Summer Tanager

June 5, 2022

June 5, 2022 at Newport News Park was a beautiful day for a bird walk.  The weather was nice with  the temperature ranging from 60 to 80, clear skies, light winds and LOW HUMIDITY!  A group of 7 participated in the morning and identified 57 species.  They were John and Marilyn Adaiar,  Dianne Snyder, Pete Peterman, Stuart Sweetman, Cindy Schulz, Sue Tomlin and Jane Frigo.  The group spent about an hour and a half circling the parking lot and bridge and identified over 30 species.  A Royal Tern started the morning off, followed by Osprey, Egrets and Herons.  Great Crested Flycatchers were busy in the early morning as were Chimney Swifts and N.Rough-winged Swallows.  After that the group headed straight to the Spawning Pond to make the walk to the Swamp Bridge.  On the way White-eyed Vireo were singing everywhere along with Prothonotary Warblers and Acadian Flycatchers.  Eastern Kingbirds were also seen perched and preening.  One of the best sightings was of a Barred Owl near Swamp Point.  Speculation is that a pair lives in that area.  It flew, perched and flew again.  Always a good day when you see an owl!  On a sad note, the power company had removed the large hardwoods and pines that lined the golf course at the Discovery Center  A species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Green Heron

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo*

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher*

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher*

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

White-eyed Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo*

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

N. Rough-winged Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch*

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird*

Brown Thrasher

Prothonotary Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Parula*

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-throated Warbler*

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Indigo Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird*

Orchard Oriole

House Finch

American Goldfinch

May 15, 2022

The population (of birders) was limited on the May 15, 2022, Sunday walk in Newport News Park because HRBC ran a field trip to Sandy Bottom on the same morning. Marc Nichols ably led Dianne Snyder, Susan and Lee Morris, Hannah Montalvo, Terry Moore, and Tom Charlock, starting as usual at the Ranger Station. At 7:00 AM we had a temperature of 63F and light southwesterly winds but were socked in by a thick fog. Despite the poor lighting, Marc was nevertheless confident about identifying a Royal Tern by beak color. Other early observations included Eastern Phoebe, Red-eyed Vireo, Northern Parula and Great-crested Flycatcher. But for a Red-tailed Hawk, we identified few additional species at the arboretum because heavy fog persisted. By 10:00 AM it had lifted at the Discovery Center, where a Turkey Vulture strutted on a power tower. We did not cross to White Oak Swamp and instead drove to the spawning pond. At the first water outlook roughly a quarter mile along the trail, Hannah spotted Prothonotary Warblers tending their nest [3 snags are 30 feet to the right of the platform, and the nest hole is in the snag closest to shore, about a man’s height above water]. More warblers, such as a high-canopy-neck-craning American Redstart were picked out along the trail. We did not reach the Swamp Bridge. At the bridge over feeble Deer Run Creek on the way back, Marc called attention to several birds quickly sounding off and then falling silent. He suspected – and found – a Barred Owl about a third of the way up the canopy. We concluded around noon, having observed 56 species, 10 of which were warblers. Weather had been dominated by a nor’easter off the coast for the previous few days. Marc said that he had not earlier experienced a May in this area with so few species; and it was likely that the northeasterly winds here caused birds to choose a more inland route for spring migration.

Canada Goose

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Red-tailed Hawk

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Barred Owl

Read Headed Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher

Eastern Phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Yellow-throated Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

House Wren

Blue-grey Gnatcatcher

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Black-and-white Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

American Redstart

Cape May Warbler

Northern Parula

Blackpoll Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

American Goldfinch

 

May 1, 2022

Migration was in full swing on May 1, 2022 and the Newport News Park walk reflected the influx of species. 76 species were identified by the group.  Participants were Grace Buskirk, Bill Boeh, Sue Tomlin, Stuart Sweetman, Tom Charlick, Todd Troussdell, Marc Nichols, Terry Moore and Jane Frigo.  Stuart Sweetman led the group around the White Oak Trail and was able to identify several first of season arrivals.  Some of those were Green Heron, Eastern Kingbird, House Wren, Gray Catbird, Louisiana Waterthrush, Summer Tanager, Scarlet Tanager, Blue Grosbeak, Blackpoll, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Acadian Flycatcher and Eastern Wood-Pewee.  There were misses for the morning, however.  like Northern Flicker, Red-headed Woodpecker and Song Sparrow.  The walk lasted until early afternoon and the group definitely was tired but the morning was well worth it!  A complete species list follows.  Remember an * after the species indicates "heard only."

 

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Green Heron

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Virginia Rail*

Solitary Sandpiper

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Mourning Dove

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Acadian Flycatcher*

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

White-eyed Vireo*

Yellow-throated Vireo*

Red-eyed Vireo*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tree Swallow

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

House Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Veery

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Gray Catbird

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Ovenbird*

Louisiana Waterthrush

Black-and-white Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Parula*

Blackpoll Warbler*

Black-throated Blue Warbler*

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler*

Eastern Towhee*

Chipping Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Summer Tanager

Scarlet Tanager

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

Orchard Oriole

House Finch 

American Goldfinch

 

April 17, 2022

 

April 17, 2022 was Easter Sunday and 10 people chose to celebrate the holiday by participating in the Newport News Park walk.  Those spending the morning at the park were Todd Trousdell, Tom Charlock, Dianne Snyder, Stuart Sweetman, Elizabeth Wilkins, Jacques van Montfrans, Jane Frigo and Marilyn and John Adair.  The group began a little tired because most had participated in the Hampton Roads Bird Club Spring Count the previous day, but early migration possibilities made the effort worthwhile.  The group was able to identify 68 species. Marc Nichols found the Great Horned Owl in the Arboretum and most of the group got to see the owl before it took flight across Constitution Avenue.  Several Palm Warblers were seen pumping their tails and showing off their beautiful rusty caps and vibrant yellow chests.  Royal and Caspian terns were seen and provided a lively discussion among the group about ways to differentiate the two species.  Another treat was a Blue-headed Vireo at the Arboretum.  The group got to see the vireo vocalize.  An Orchard Oriole was seen, too.  A FOS Prothonotary Warbler was particularly cooperative at Swamp Point and many were able to get some excellent photos.  By far the best sighting was of a FOS Hooded Warbler! The group missed it on the way to the Swamp Bridge but spent extra time looking for it on the return trip and were rewarded.  Jacque got some wonderful pictures!!  Please note that on the next walk, May 1, Stuart Sweetman will be leading the group around the White Oak Trail.  This special walk will be to catch the peak of the migrating birds and will involve a bit more walking.  A complete species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Laughing Gull 

Ring-billed Gull

Caspian Tern

Royal Tern

Mourning Dove

Great Horned Owl

Barred Owl*

Chimney Swift

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Blue-headed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

N. Rough-winged Swallow

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch*

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Carolina Wren

House Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Prothonotary Warbler

Common Yellowthroat*

Hooded Warbler

Northern Parula

Palm Warbler

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler*

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

Orchard Oriole

House Finch 

American Goldfinch

 

April 3, 2022

 

April 3, 2022 was a perfect day to enjoy Newport News City Park and experience birding.  Skies were clear and the temperature pleasant, staying in the 50's and 60's.  18 people participated in the morning walk.  They included Elizabeth Wilkins, Melissa Freudenberg, Rob Nichols, Dianne Snyder, June Hartzler, Gary Wright, Bill Boeh, Stuart Sweetman, Marc Nichols, Cindy Schulz, Hannah Montalvo, Tom Charlock, Jane Frigo, John and Marilyn Adair, Lynn and Chris Hakanson and first timer Grace Buskirk.  Together the group identified 59 species which included 4 FOS,,,Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-throated Warbler, Palm Warbler and White-eyed Vireo.  The group could not be sure if one bird was a Sharp-shinned or Cooper's Hawk so agreed to just count it as "hawk species".  Cedar Waxwings were still at the Arboretum along with Dark-eyed Juncos.  Only the Ruby-crowned Kinglet could be found so there was speculation the Golden-crowned Kinglet may have left for the season.  Brown Creepers were spotted and Hooded Mergansers.  Surprisingly, no Northern Mockingbird or Brown Thrasher could be found.  The group spent time discussing Muskrats and Beavers as one or the other was swimming in the area near the paddle boats. Also a beautiful butterfly was seen and the group wondered if it was a Black-swallowtail or dark morph Tiger-swallowtail.  A heads up to those planning on attending the first walk in May, Stuart Sweetman will be leading the group around the 2 and a half mile White Oak Trail in an effort to get more of the woodland warblers.  A complete species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

Mallard

Hooded Merganser

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Hawk species

Red-tailed Hawk

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Royal Tern

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker*

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

White-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Cedar Waxwing

Common Yellowthroat

Palm Warbler

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

March 20, 2022

Time is passing quickly and Spring is in full swing.  March 20, 2022 at the park brought the departure of a majority of the duck species and the arrival of two summer residents--Purple Martin and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.  Participants in the morning included Pete and Charm Peterman, Chris and Lynne Hakanson, Tom Charlock, Todd Trousbell, Stuart Sweetman, SueTomlin, Melissa Freudenberg, Shawn Dash and Jane Frigo.  Winter residents included Winter Wren, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and both Kinglets, to name a few.  Misses for the morning were Black Vulture, Mourning Dove and Northern Mockingbird.  A species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

Gadwall

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Hooded Merganser

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk

Virginia Rail

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull

Belted Kingfisher*

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren*

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

March 5, 2022

 

Time is passing quickly and Spring is in full swing.  March 20, 2022 at the park brought the departure of a majority of the duck species and the arrival of two summer residents--Purple Martin and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.  Participants in the morning included Pete and Charm Peterman, Chris and Lynne Hakanson, Tom Charlock, Todd Trousbell, Stuart Sweetman, SueTomlin, Melissa Freudenberg, Shawn Dash and Jane Frigo.  Winter residents included Winter Wren, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and both Kinglets, to name a few.  Misses for the morning were Black Vulture, Mourning Dove and Northern Mockingbird.  A species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

Gadwall

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Hooded Merganser

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-shouldered Hawk

Virginia Rail

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull

Belted Kingfisher*

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren*

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

 

March 5, 2022

The regular first Sunday walk at Newport News Park, scheduled for March 6, 2022, had to be cancelled due to the One City Marathon.  A last minute change to Saturday, March 5, 2022, was decided and proved to be a great decision.  The only problem was getting the word of the change out to everyone,  Thanks to Tom Charlock sending an email to members, a few loyal birders turned out on Saturday.  The group included Pete Peterman, Dave Youker, Heidi Young. Marc Nichols, Sue Tomlin, Stuart Sweetman, Jane Frigo and John and Marilyn Adair.  The weather was perfect, 40-60 degrees, skies variable and winds light.  By noon the group was able to identify 63 species!  It was a banner day for ducks with 8 species seen, the best being a pair of Northern Shovelers.  A thrilling sign that migration was beginning was a huge V of Tundra Swans moving northwest!  16 Great Egrets were feeding in the upper reservoir.  Water levels were exceptionally low and the group felt that the shallow water made feeding more appealing to both ducks and Great Egrets.  An early walk to the Swamp Bridge gave everyone a wonderful view of the Virginia Rail.  As with the last walk, several rails were heard but only one was curious enough to walk into the open and show his beautiful rusty plumage!  On the return trip from the swamp, Marc Nichols was able to locate a Barred Owl being mobbed by jays.  Anytime an owl is seen is a great day!  The cherry blossoms were blooming at the Arboretum and Cedar Waxwings were seen gleaning the last of the holly berries.  A species list follows (*seen only).

 

Canada Goose

Tundra Swan

Wood Duck

Gadwall

American Wigeon

American Black Duck

Mallard

Northern Shoveler

 Ring-necked Duck

Hooded Merganser

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Virginia Rail

Ring-billed Gull

Mourning Dove

Barred Owl

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker*

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tree Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren*

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Rusty Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch*

 

February 20, 2022

February 20, 2022 was clear and cold with freezing temperatures at 7 AM and not rising  much over the morning.  Emily Argo, Pete Peterman, Bill Boeh, Dianne Snyder, Stuart Sweetman, Rob Nichols, Cindy Schulz, John Adair, Heidi Young and Jane Frigo participated in the walk and were able to identify 50 species.   Not as many varieties of ducks were seen but Great Egrets dotted the banks.  A lone Laughing Gull was seen among the many Double-crested Cormorants and Ring-billed Gulls lined up on the pipeline.  By far the best sighting was a group of Virginia Rails at the Swamp Bridge.  Although the rails have been heard occasionally their secretive behavior makes them very difficult to see.  This morning was the exception.  Quite a bit of time was spent on the Swamp Bridge platform waiting for a glimpse of the rails chasing each other through the reeds.  At least 3 were seen with more possible in the group.  A complete list of sightings follows.

 

Canada Goose

Gadwall

American Wigeon

Mallard

Hooded Merganser

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Black Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Virginia Rail

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Mourning Dove

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

February 6, 2022

At last, a Sunday bird walk that didn't require sprinting from shelter to shelter to avoid rain!  February 6, 2022 was clear but cold (29 to 35 degrees).  Shifting breezes made it seem even colder.  Those braving the weather included Rob Nichols, Emily Argo, Bill Boeh, Stuart Sweetman, Melissa Freudnberger, Marc Nichols, Hannah Montalvo, Jane Frigo and Bay Journal reporter Jeremy Cox.  Winter storms hitting the northern states and bringing two weekends of snowfall to the Tidewater area also brought in a variety of ducks.  They included Gadwall, American Wigeon, American Black Duck, Mallard, Ring-necked Duck, Buffelhead, Hooded Merganser and a possible Northern Pintail hen.  A group of Canada Geese seemed smaller and had what appeared to be shorter necks than those usually seen on the golf course.  The idea that they may be a migrating flock was considered.  Ring-billed Gulls and Double-crested Cormorants lined the pipeline.  All 7 woodpecker species were seen with the exception of Hairy and Pileated being  heard only.   A group of Cedar Waxwings was enjoyed at the Arboretum..  Surprisingly, the usually ever abundant Yellow-rumped Warbler was not seen until the group made the walk to the Swamp Bridge.  Jeremy Cox was doing research on the Merlin app.   The birders matched their skills with Merlin.  It was amazing how much they agreed.  At the end of the morning 55 species were identified, an amazing number for the first of February!  A complete species list follows.  * indicates birds heard only.

 

Canada Goose

Gadwall

American Wigeon

American Black Duck

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Bufflehead

Hooded Merganser

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Ring-billed Gull

Mourning Dove

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker*

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler*

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

American Goldfinch

 

January 16, 2022

 

At last a morning walk that didn't begin with rain but rather ended with rain.  January 16, 2022 began with the temperature at freezing, cloudy skies and rain/snow to arrive later in the day.  Heidi Young,, John Adair, Stuart Sweetman, Marc Nichols, Cindy Schulz and Jane Frigo birded from 7 AM to 10:30 AM and identified 48 species before the sleet started.  All birds counted were seen with the exception of Downy Woodpecker and House Finch heard only.  Adult and juvenile Red-headed Woodpeckers were seen again.  Herring and Ring-billed gulls were identified. Surprisingly no Great Blue Heron was seen, possibly because of ice near the shore line.  Other misses were Pine Warbler and Yellow-rumped Warbler.  A Hermit Thrush gave quite a show at the Arboretum providing long looks from every angle. Ring-necked Ducks, Hooded Mergansers, Mallards and Pied-billed Grebes were spotted but it took Marc Nichols to find a couple Gadwalls and Great Egrets and a Kingfisher in the Spawning Pond after the group called it quits.  Stuart Sweetman added the Winter Wren by the Ranger Station as he exited the park.  All in all it was a great, but cold, morning.  A complete species list follows.

 

Canada Goose

Gadwall

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Hooded Merganser

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Egret

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Red-tailed Hawk

Ring-billed Gull 

Herring Gull

Mourning Dove

Belted Kingfisher

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker*

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Blue Jay

American Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Winter Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Chipping Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Rusty Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch* 

American Goldfinch

January 2, 2022

January 2, 2022 was the beginning of another year of bi-monthly bird walks at Newport News Park.  Rain dampened the mood but didn't stop the birdwatchers!  Cindy Schulz, Jacque van Montfrans, Elizabeth Wilkins, John Adair, Tom Morocco, Melissa Freudenberg, Shawn Dash, Marc Nichols and Jane Frigo braved the weather and were able to identify 44 species before 10 AM.  The morning began with a pair of Horned Owls vocalizing from the campground. In the Ranger Parking Lot the group moved from shelter to shelter until the rain turned to a light mist. Water species seen included Canada Goose, Mallard, Ring-necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Pied-billed Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant and Great Blue Heron. Hopefully more duck species will be pushed down with the approaching cold fronts.  Adult and juvenile Bald Eagles were seen but no Kingfisher.  Finally an adult Red-headed Woodpecker showed up and gave the group a real show.  Kinglets, both Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned, brightened up the morning.  The group also got to see a beaver crossing reservoir!  A complete species list follows. *indicates heard only

 

Canada Goose

Mallard

Ring-necked Duck

Hooded Merganser

Pied-billed Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Turkey Vulture

Bald Eagle

Ring-billed Gull

Mourning Dove

Great Horned Owl*

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker*

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch*

Brown Creeper

Carolina Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Cedar Waxwing

Pine Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Chipping Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Northern Cardinal

Red-winged Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

American Goldfinch*

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Previous Sunday Walk Reports:

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009 

2008

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© 2023 by Hampton Roads Bird Club

Contact: Dave Youker  |  757.344.9385  |  youkerd@aol.com